Monday, August 12, 2013

There is No Place Like Home

“Not that she didn’t enjoy the holidays: but she always felt—and it was, perhaps, the measure of her peculiar happiness—a little relieved when they were over. Her normal life pleased her so well that she was half afraid to step out of its frame in case one day she should find herself unable to get back."
- Jan Struther, Mrs. Miniver

I just read this quote and it spoke to how I felt as I waved goodbye to my hometown and started our eight hour drive back to Virginia. I told Brian I have felt so removed from my life in Richmond, as though I have been in a foreign country on an extended visa. The reunification with my childhood girlfriends and high school classmates rivaled living a parallel life. I have these amazing women in my life in Richmond, women who know me in a way that my New York girls do not; and my New York girlfriends who know me in a way my Richmond girls never knew. I have always said to Brian I step back into my younger self coming back to the town we grew up in, and when driving back to Virginia I step forward into the person I am now. I suppose this is true of all of us; kind of like how my sister and I always gravitate toward the kids' table at Thanksgiving, as if we never whole heartedly accepted the invitation to the adult table, and secretly pine to be back at the little table in the corner where calories do not count and inappropriate behavior is welcome.

After the 20 year reunion we all went home, back to our lives we have built determined by the paths we have chosen after tossing our tasseled caps in the air. I suppose we all skated through parallel universes this past weekend, sliding doors into pockets of memories. I cried leaving so many of my friends, but I laughed so much more than I cried. Nicholas Sparks wrote, 

The reason it hurts so much to separate is because our souls are connected. Maybe they always have been and will be. Maybe we've lived a thousand lives before this one and in each of them we've found each other. And maybe each time, we've been forced apart for the same reasons. That means that this goodbye is both a goodbye for the past ten thousand years and a prelude to what will come.” 

As we pulled into our driveway and I opened the car door into the muggy Virginia night, as I was bitten fourteen times by mosquitos just carrying our luggage to the front door and my flawless straight New York hair began to frizz and curl in the relentless humidity; I could not help but to feel completely content. I gave Brian a kiss, the guy who knows me both as a young girl and as the woman I am now and loves me deeply, the boys rush into the house like animals who have been caged too long squealing with joy to be back, I was home. 

Love & Light,

I wish I had beautiful photos from the reunion to illustrate the great time I had, but the blurry, drunken iPhone photos speak more to the moment. 










And a few silly ones of my boys.







1 comment :

  1. "kind of like how my sister and I always gravitate toward the kids' table at Thanksgiving, as if we never whole heartedly accepted the invitation to the adult table, and secretly pine to be back at the little table in the corner where calories do not count and inappropriate behavior is welcome."


    Does this mean I can't sit at the kids table anymore either?? =)

    ReplyDelete